2017 News Archive

Jun 6, 2017

When a patient is prescribed the wrong antibiotic to treat a bacterial infection, it’s not necessarily the physician who is at fault.

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May 15, 2017

Nothing beats nature. The diverse and wonderful varieties of cells and tissues that comprise the human body are evidence of that.

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May 10, 2017

Anyone who has experienced jet lag knows that changing time zones can wreak havoc on our circadian rhythms. Modulated by external cues such as sunlight and temperature, the roughly 24-hour cycles in our physiological processes are extremely sensitive. Humans aren’t the only creatures whose circadian rhythms are dictated by light. The tiny Drosophila melanogaster — known more commonly as the fruit fly — sets its regular day-and-night-activity cycles in response to light.

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Apr 27, 2017

Congratulations to MCDB professor Stu Feinstein, who has been awarded the 2017 Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Research.

Apr 26, 2017

MCDB is sad to announce the passing of MCDB Emeritus Professor Robert Sinsheimer

Bob was one of the early pioneers of molecular biology, led the Biology division at Cal Tech for many years, served as Chancellor of U.C. Santa Cruz, and was a valued colleague and friend here at MCDB for several decades.

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Leah Foltz Finishes First-place a
Apr 24, 2017

Foltz, a graduate student in the lab of MCDB professor Dennis Clegg, delivered an engaging summary of recent strides in stem cell research and how her lab uses this biological material to study blinding diseases. Her research explores whether scientists will one day be able to use someone’s own cells to cure their blindness. Foltz’s lively delivery earned her a first-place finish in the campuswide competition. Now she’s headed to San Francisco to test her mettle Thursday, May 4, against participants from the nine other University of California campuses.

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Apr 24, 2017

MCDB professor Chuck Samuel has been selected as this year’s Faculty Research Lecturer, which is the highest honor the UCSB faculty can bestow on one of its members. Dr. Samuel was selected by his peers in recognition of his extraordinary achievements in research and scholarly work, as well as his outstanding professional competence and international impact in his field. One component of this award is the honor of presenting a lecture of interest to a broad community of scholars and a cultivated public during an event in fall quarter of 2017 with an associated dinner.

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Apr 5, 2017

It’s a problem that parents know all too well: a child won’t eat because their oatmeal is too slimy or a slice of apple is too hard. Is the kid just being finicky? Or is there a biological basis for disliking food based on its texture? The work highlighted in the NIH Director’s blog by Zhang, Montell and colleagues, provides some of the first evidence that biology could indeed play a role.

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Mar 20, 2017

The Art of Science competition is an annual event where undergraduates, graduate students, and postdocs are invited to submit images that "capture the imagination and share the beauty of science." The event is hosted and sponsored by The Schuller Lab and the Center for Science and Engineering Partnerships (CSEP) at the California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI) together with the College of Creative Studies and UCSB Library. This year was the 4th annual competition. Over 60 submissions were received this year and the award ceremony was held on March 15.

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Mar 15, 2017

So they can’t use smartphones or WiFi, but bacteria have evolved some seriously complex strategies to communicate with one another. And the resulting interactions are a delicate balance of cooperation and, in some cases, competition. These intraspecies exchanges take place within contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems, which regulate cellular activities via cell-to-cell contact and are found in a wide variety of gram-negative bacteria, including important human pathogens such as Escherichia coli. New research by MCDB scientists examines how a particular pathogenic strain of E.

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